Belle

Galét

  Galét -  2005 DAME AU COCHON (1879)   ROPS The model for...

Weeping Willow Woman 2014

Heron,Willow, Suzuki Kiitsu,1796-1858 In early spring 2009 I took a...

On the Beach 2014

    LOST PLEIAD 1884  - BOUGUEREAUSeveral things came...

Plume Fatale

Plume Fatale -  2009 The painting Chloe, which could be the most famous...

Flora Furiosa

Flora Furiosa 2007 Botticelli's masterpiece is a complicated painting and...

Freya

Freya 2010 Reija asked me to take a picture of her that was reminiscent of...

Ophelia

Ophelia 2008 I went to Art College in Kingston, London, on the banks of a...

Labyrinth

Labyrinth 2011 Many of my images are set in the landscape of an area of...

Lilith

Lilith 2009 On the borders of Tuscany and Latium in a sparsely inhabited...

Venus of the Sherds

Venus of the Sherds 2005 One of the greatest paintings of the Renaissance,...

Phryne

Phryne 2007 A legend, possibly based on fact, has it that Phryne, a...

Danae

Danae 2009 Acrisius King of Argos locked his fair daughter Danae up in an...

Homage to Corday

Homage to Corday 1988 This photo, the first of the series, was a response to...

Klimtomania

Klimtomania 2006 Klimt painted two versions of the bloody biblical story of...

Flying Down to Rio

Flying Down to Rio 2012 Vargas or 'Varga' was the most famous pin-up artist...

Casalisca

Casalisca by Patrick Nicholas based on “La Grande Odalisque” by...

“Each picture is a take on a world-famous painting, in styles ranging from pre-Raphaelite to art deco. The works of art have been re-created down to the temperamental skies of Giorgione’s Sleeping Venus, or the bold daubs of a de Lempicka portrait. But they have also been ingeniously updated: Ingres’ Grande Odalisque is now equipped with a telephone; and in the Giorgione mock-up, as Venus sleeps, her mountain bike can be seen in the background. Common to each is a beautiful female central subject in a state of tasteful undress. Patrick Nicholas, the photographer, captures the allure of his subjects without resorting to gratuitous smut. He has done the classical masters proud.”

Nicholas Farrel from The Sunday Times magazine